Type 2 Diabetes – a Silent, Greater Threat

Type 2 Diabetes – a Silent, Greater Threat

 
Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time your pancreas is not able to keep up and cannot produce enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal. Some people with type 2 can control their blood glucose with healthy eating and being active. Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, as well as the aged population.
 
Today, almost 10 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes. Many people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at younger ages, with some women developing type 2 diabetes in their teens or early 20s. And with advancing age, the risk of your getting type 2 diabetes goes up, too, especially if you don’t change any of the diabetes risk factors you have control over, like your weight and physical activity level. Women who get type 2 diabetes are at greater risk than men of cardiovascular disease and of blindness, just two of the disease’s complications.
 
As you age, the likelihood of getting other chronic illnesses related to diabetes increases, especially if your lifestyle choices haven’t improved. It’s very important to try to reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by keeping your optimal body weight, eating well, and exercising. And if you’ve already been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, these same healthy practices, along with controlling your blood sugar, will help you avoid some of the problems that may occur as a result of the disease and keep long-term complications at bay.
 
 As you bring your blood-glucose levels under control, these symptoms will begin to abate. However, like many people with type 2 diabetes, you might not have any symptoms at all — which can sometimes make it harder to grasp the seriousness of your diagnosis. Whether you have symptoms or not, over time uncontrolled levels of high blood sugar can lead to tissue damage throughout your body, from your eyes to your toes. Fortunately, controlling your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems.
 
Diabetes is one of the most common illnesses encountered by internists. An estimated 23.6 million persons have diabetes in the United States, and only 17.9 million of these cases have been diagnosed. The incidence of diabetes is increasing because of the aging and changing ethnic mix of the population and because of worsening obesity. On the basis of current trends, the prevalence of diabetes is expected to nearly double by 2030. Although diabetes care is improving by many measures, complications are still common, and diabetes remains the leading cause of visual loss, amputation, and end-stage renal disease in the United States. 
 
Watif Health brings to you an easy and effective way of monitoring and regulating your blood levels. The app not only gives you a detailed report on the probable risk factors you are prone to but also provides guidelines which will empower you to live a stress-free, routine life. Visit us to know more.